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Posts by Steve Zande

Left Twist Vs. Right Twist Industrial Sewing Thread

Choosing the correct twist for the industrial sewing thread used in your application is an important consideration in how smoothly your manufacturing process works. That is why it's important to know the difference between left twist and right twist industrial sewing threads.

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Industrial Multifilament Yarns and Importance of Twist

Twist can impact the dynamics of your final product in many ways – strength, elongation, diameter, torque, lustre, softness etc. Unlike staple spun yarns, multifilament yarns lose strength as the twist is increased, therefore it is important to know the physical requirements required in the end product. Elongation increases with increasing twist, as does diameter, torque and lustre. Yarns become stiffer with twist therefore softness decreases. 

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General Specs: Best High Tenacity Polyester Yarn Suppliers Compared

When setting out to find the best industrial high tenacity polyester, it's important to know and understand the key physical properties you are looking for, and to understand the units of measure being presented for each one. The table below contains a list of some of the largest polyester yarn producers in the world, as well as a list of polyester yarn specifications for specific types of their 1000 Dn (1100 dtex) high tenacity standard polyester yarns.

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Improving Karg Braider Performance with Yarn Bobbin Design

 One of our large industrial hose manufacturing customers had problems getting long lengths without yarn breaks or run outs in their Karg reinforcement yarn braiding department.  Like most fluid hose manufacturers, they were using a combination of flanged bobbins wound in-house and cardboard prewound braider tubes to meet their production scheudule demands.  

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Common Industrial Kevlar® and Aramid Yarn Applications

Dupont™ Kevlar®and other aramid yarns and threads are used in many industries including:

  • high temperature fluid hose manufacturing as reinforcement
  • electrical wire and cable for binding, ripcords, strength members and shielding (braided)
  • composite materials- aramid fabric is used for strength and reinforcement
  • ballistics, to sew proctective garmets, body armour and bullet proof vests
  • rope manufacturing for added strength
  • synthetic web-slings for sewing and round sling filler yarn
  • mattress manufacturing for sewing tape edge seams

Most of the products made with Kevlar® and other aramid yarns require high strength and/or fire retardant characteristics. The unique nature and production processes to make aramid fibers are some reasons aramids are much more expensive than other commodity fibers like cotton, polyester and nylon. Common characteristics among Kevlar® and other Aramid fibers include:

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Bonded versus Soft Industrial Sewing Threads

 Multifilament nylons, polyesters and aramid yarns go through a series of twisting and winding steps during the sewing thread manufacturing process.  The twisting process is generally required to convert any yarn into a thread that can be used for sewing, but bonding, an additional process step, may not be needed depending on the size, use and industrial application. 

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Alternatives to Kevlar® Fiber: Industrial Yarn and Threads

Some of the higher priced industrial yarns and threads available are made from Dupont™ Kevlar® fiber. As the pioneer aramid fiber, DuPont™ Kevlar® is specified for some product applications with a long qualification process, however, some industrial applications can benefit by looking at alternative aramid yarns and threads.

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Polyester vs Nylon for Lifting Slings

Lead Blog Post Image

More and more webbing manufacturers are using nylon rather than polyester. We’ll discuss why and how to make the switch if you’re considering it.

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Increase Efficiency for High Speed Bag Sewing by Increasing Tape and Thread Yield

Lead Blog Post Image

We’ve found an effective, common-sense way to increase bag packaging productivity between 30 and 40 tons per roll.   

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Steve Zande

VP of Sales

Recent Posts

Choosing the correct twist for the industrial sewing thread used in your application is an important consideration in how smoothly your manufacturing process works. That is why it's important to know the difference between left twist and right twist industrial sewing threads.

Read more

Twist can impact the dynamics of your final product in many ways – strength, elongation, diameter, torque, lustre, softness etc. Unlike staple spun yarns, multifilament yarns lose strength as the twist is increased, therefore it is important to know the physical requirements required in the end product. Elongation increases with increasing twist, as does diameter, torque and lustre. Yarns become stiffer with twist therefore softness decreases. 

Read more

When setting out to find the best industrial high tenacity polyester, it's important to know and understand the key physical properties you are looking for, and to understand the units of measure being presented for each one. The table below contains a list of some of the largest polyester yarn producers in the world, as well as a list of polyester yarn specifications for specific types of their 1000 Dn (1100 dtex) high tenacity standard polyester yarns.

Read more

 One of our large industrial hose manufacturing customers had problems getting long lengths without yarn breaks or run outs in their Karg reinforcement yarn braiding department.  Like most fluid hose manufacturers, they were using a combination of flanged bobbins wound in-house and cardboard prewound braider tubes to meet their production scheudule demands.  

Read more

Dupont™ Kevlar®and other aramid yarns and threads are used in many industries including:

  • high temperature fluid hose manufacturing as reinforcement
  • electrical wire and cable for binding, ripcords, strength members and shielding (braided)
  • composite materials- aramid fabric is used for strength and reinforcement
  • ballistics, to sew proctective garmets, body armour and bullet proof vests
  • rope manufacturing for added strength
  • synthetic web-slings for sewing and round sling filler yarn
  • mattress manufacturing for sewing tape edge seams

Most of the products made with Kevlar® and other aramid yarns require high strength and/or fire retardant characteristics. The unique nature and production processes to make aramid fibers are some reasons aramids are much more expensive than other commodity fibers like cotton, polyester and nylon. Common characteristics among Kevlar® and other Aramid fibers include:

Read more

 Multifilament nylons, polyesters and aramid yarns go through a series of twisting and winding steps during the sewing thread manufacturing process.  The twisting process is generally required to convert any yarn into a thread that can be used for sewing, but bonding, an additional process step, may not be needed depending on the size, use and industrial application. 

Read more

Some of the higher priced industrial yarns and threads available are made from Dupont™ Kevlar® fiber. As the pioneer aramid fiber, DuPont™ Kevlar® is specified for some product applications with a long qualification process, however, some industrial applications can benefit by looking at alternative aramid yarns and threads.

Read more
Lead Blog Post Image

More and more webbing manufacturers are using nylon rather than polyester. We’ll discuss why and how to make the switch if you’re considering it.

Read more
Lead Blog Post Image

We’ve found an effective, common-sense way to increase bag packaging productivity between 30 and 40 tons per roll.   

Read more