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Troubleshooting Series - How to Check Industrial Sewing Thread

Checking your sewing thread regularly is the best way to prevent wearing and shedding that can harm your sewing process.

In this video, Service Thread Sewing Sales and Tech Support Manager Dane Hatcher demonstrates how to check your thread for UV damage, look for bond separation, examine the twist level, check the bobbin tack, and make sure you have enough lube in the top thread.

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Lower Manufacturing Costs By Increasing Hose Production Line Speeds

Hose manufacturing partners running high tenacity polyester, nylon and para-aramid yarns all strive for one thing: lower manufacturing costs. There are many cost cutting methods, but the most effective are automation and faster line speeds. Faster line speeds often depend on equipment capabilities, design and material supply.

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Guide to Yarn Cord and Tape Dimensions (aka Width or Gauge)

Many industries use cord and tape in their products, like motor manufacturing, automotive, aerospace, and recreational sports. There are also many military uses of cord and tape which cover mil-specs A-A-52080, 81, 82, 83, and 84.

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A Guide to Determining Sewing Speed Without Specialized Tools

You can determine sewing speed without using any type of specialized tools. Simply follow the steps outlined below.

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The Importance of Your Tube and Package Dimensions

The tubes and packages you choose for your industrial yarn and thread can have a big impact on your production efficiency. They affect your process, your ability to operate at high speeds, your rate of slowdowns, your overall productivity, and ultimately your success as a company. 

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Troubleshooting Series - Industrial Sewing Tension Setting Tutorial

If your machine’s tension is wrong, you’ll deal with thread shedding, pulling, and breakage, plus poor stitch quality.

In this video from our troubleshooting series, Service Thread Sewing Sales and Tech Support Manager Dane Hatcher demonstrates how to adjust your bobbin tension, how to avoid common mistakes, and how to know when the tension is just right.

Read more

Troubleshooting Series - Industrial Sewing Shuttle Maintenance Tutorial

Do you have lint or lubrication buildup in your industrial sewing machine’s shuttle?

In this video, Service Thread Sewing Sales and Tech Support Manager Dane Hatcher demonstrates how to remove the shuttle and shuttle race, then perform a quick examination and cleaning routine that ensures your machine is in good working order.

Read more

Tensile Testing for Yarn and Thread

Knowing the tensile strength of industrial yarn and thread is essential to maintaining the productivity of production environments. By pinpointing the tensile strength, you can operate within safe bounds to prevent breaks that halt production and hamper efficiency.

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Industrial Sewing Thread vs Household Sewing Thread

Industrial sewing thread is quite different from the thread that is typically used in garments and apparel. If you’re looking for household sewing thread, we’d like to direct you to Walmart, Michael’s, or another household thread supplier.

Not sure which is which? Here’s a look at the main differences between industrial sewing thread and household sewing thread, plus some tips on choosing the right thread for your application.

Read more

Advantages of Round Twisted and Flat Lacing Tape Stator Cords

When you buy an electric motor, what is often unseen when handling it is the work that goes into helping extend its life by securing the end coils of windings. This process is called stator lacing. Tightly lacing the coils adds stability and helps protect the windings from vibration, which can cause fatigue and shorten a motor’s life. It also holds electronic, thermal, and other sensory devices in place during the dipping and baking process.

Service Thread’s round lacing cords are available in polyester, nylon, and para-aramid materials such as DuPont™ Kevlar® material. These are cabled constructions, typically three or sometimes four-ply, which offer a round cross-section. Round twisted sizes in nylon and polyester cords can range from number 138 to 690 (tex 135 to 700), offering minimum breaking strengths in the range of 18 to 100 pounds.

However, most common round twisted sizes are number 346 (tex 350), number 415 (tex 400), number 554 (tex 600), and number 690 (tex 700), which offer minimum breaking strengths in the range of 45 to 100 pounds. Round twisted lacing cords number 138 to 690 (tex 135 to 700) will have a diameter between about .01 to .05 inches, while the diameter of most common lacing cords will be .035 inches plus or minus about 15%.

Flat number 554 (tex 600) nylon lacing tape is also a popular choice. Being wider than round twisted thread, it will spread the stress over the coil surface during winding and tying rather than having it located at a small radius. Flat tape also offers increased grip due to its larger surface area.

Round thread can be laced evenly from large supply packages of more than or equal to 10 pounds. Flat constructions are typically rolled to prevent any twisting of the tape. Round twisted lacing cords are much preferred over cable ties, which turn brittle over time through oxidation and break and leave sharp edges which can cut installers’ hands when reaching into confined spaces.

Lacing cords may have some physical requirements, depending on the motor design and coil assembly.

Read more

Troubleshooting Series - How to Check Industrial Sewing Thread

Checking your sewing thread regularly is the best way to prevent wearing and shedding that can harm your sewing process.

In this video, Service Thread Sewing Sales and Tech Support Manager Dane Hatcher demonstrates how to check your thread for UV damage, look for bond separation, examine the twist level, check the bobbin tack, and make sure you have enough lube in the top thread.

Read more

Older Posts

Hose manufacturing partners running high tenacity polyester, nylon and para-aramid yarns all strive for one thing: lower manufacturing costs. There are many cost cutting methods, but the most effective are automation and faster line speeds. Faster line speeds often depend on equipment capabilities, design and material supply.

Read more

Many industries use cord and tape in their products, like motor manufacturing, automotive, aerospace, and recreational sports. There are also many military uses of cord and tape which cover mil-specs A-A-52080, 81, 82, 83, and 84.

Read more

You can determine sewing speed without using any type of specialized tools. Simply follow the steps outlined below.

Read more

The tubes and packages you choose for your industrial yarn and thread can have a big impact on your production efficiency. They affect your process, your ability to operate at high speeds, your rate of slowdowns, your overall productivity, and ultimately your success as a company. 

Read more

If your machine’s tension is wrong, you’ll deal with thread shedding, pulling, and breakage, plus poor stitch quality.

In this video from our troubleshooting series, Service Thread Sewing Sales and Tech Support Manager Dane Hatcher demonstrates how to adjust your bobbin tension, how to avoid common mistakes, and how to know when the tension is just right.

Read more

Do you have lint or lubrication buildup in your industrial sewing machine’s shuttle?

In this video, Service Thread Sewing Sales and Tech Support Manager Dane Hatcher demonstrates how to remove the shuttle and shuttle race, then perform a quick examination and cleaning routine that ensures your machine is in good working order.

Read more

Knowing the tensile strength of industrial yarn and thread is essential to maintaining the productivity of production environments. By pinpointing the tensile strength, you can operate within safe bounds to prevent breaks that halt production and hamper efficiency.

Read more

Industrial sewing thread is quite different from the thread that is typically used in garments and apparel. If you’re looking for household sewing thread, we’d like to direct you to Walmart, Michael’s, or another household thread supplier.

Not sure which is which? Here’s a look at the main differences between industrial sewing thread and household sewing thread, plus some tips on choosing the right thread for your application.

Read more

When you buy an electric motor, what is often unseen when handling it is the work that goes into helping extend its life by securing the end coils of windings. This process is called stator lacing. Tightly lacing the coils adds stability and helps protect the windings from vibration, which can cause fatigue and shorten a motor’s life. It also holds electronic, thermal, and other sensory devices in place during the dipping and baking process.

Service Thread’s round lacing cords are available in polyester, nylon, and para-aramid materials such as DuPont™ Kevlar® material. These are cabled constructions, typically three or sometimes four-ply, which offer a round cross-section. Round twisted sizes in nylon and polyester cords can range from number 138 to 690 (tex 135 to 700), offering minimum breaking strengths in the range of 18 to 100 pounds.

However, most common round twisted sizes are number 346 (tex 350), number 415 (tex 400), number 554 (tex 600), and number 690 (tex 700), which offer minimum breaking strengths in the range of 45 to 100 pounds. Round twisted lacing cords number 138 to 690 (tex 135 to 700) will have a diameter between about .01 to .05 inches, while the diameter of most common lacing cords will be .035 inches plus or minus about 15%.

Flat number 554 (tex 600) nylon lacing tape is also a popular choice. Being wider than round twisted thread, it will spread the stress over the coil surface during winding and tying rather than having it located at a small radius. Flat tape also offers increased grip due to its larger surface area.

Round thread can be laced evenly from large supply packages of more than or equal to 10 pounds. Flat constructions are typically rolled to prevent any twisting of the tape. Round twisted lacing cords are much preferred over cable ties, which turn brittle over time through oxidation and break and leave sharp edges which can cut installers’ hands when reaching into confined spaces.

Lacing cords may have some physical requirements, depending on the motor design and coil assembly.

Read more