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Service Class 7 Troubleshooting Video Guide

Is your industrial sewing process affected by thread skips, breaks, and shedding? In our latest video tutorial, Service Thread Sewing Sales & Tech Support Manager, Dane Hatcher demonstrates how to avoid thread problems by properly adjusting your machine.

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What Is the Difference Between Ticket Size and Tex Size for Bonded Thread?

Bonded thread size is communicated in various ways, mainly by ticket number and tex size. Although it’s easy to get caught up in the lingo and confuse the two, the ticket number and tex size are distinct characteristics of a bonded thread.

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Can Kevlar® Be Dyed?

Anyone who works with industrial fabrics knows DuPont™ Kevlar® has a reputation for being one of the world’s toughest fabrics. However, it’s sometimes criticized for being impossible to dye. This isn’t completely true.

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What Effect Does Bonded Thread Have On Tensions in a Sewing Application?

When industrial sewing operations require high thread or yarn tensions, properly designed sewing threads and yarns are critical to continuous production flow. Bonded sewing thread and yarn tends to perform well for critical and challenging sewing conditions often faced by manufacturing companies. We’d like to provide some insight into how bonded thread affects tension in industrial sewing and manufacturing.

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What is the Difference Between Bonded and Non-bonded Thread?

It’s important to evaluate whether you should be using a bonded or non-bonded thread in your industrial sewing process. For manufacturers, each type of industrial sewing thread or yarn has its own set of advantages and disadvantages, so let’s take a closer look at each option and which might be right for your application.

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Why Do I Need Bonded Thread For My Process?

When you’re sewing at high speeds, bonded thread prevents snags and breaks that cause production interruptions and create flaws in your products. In many applications, bonded sewing thread is almost always a superior choice. 

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The Difference Between Nylon 6.6 and Nylon 6

Nylon is a family of polymers, and all nylons share certain characteristics. However,there are some significant differences among types of nylon. Not all nylons are the same.

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Overview of Advanced and Modern Materials for Yarn and Thread Construction

Are you using the most modern and advanced yarn and thread? If you haven’t re-evaluated your options lately, it’s a good time to compare the latest yarn and thread materials to see if there is a better choice.

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Flame Retardant vs. Flame Resistant Threads And Yarns

What Is The Difference Between Flame Retardant And Flame Resistant Threads And Yarns
 
Untreated continuous multifilament polyester yarn, on the left, burns vigorously when the ignition temperature is reached, then melts, emits black smoke, and drips. FR treated continuous multifilament polyester, in the middle, shrinks away from the flame, melts, and drips, but it resists flaming once the source is removed. Therefore the smoke is greatly reduced and the retardant has done its job. Untreated aramid yarn, on the right, burns with difficulty because of its high LOI, so the flame extinguishes when the heat source is removed. Aramid does not melt but decomposes, showing signs of thermal degradation.

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What Are Flame Resistant Yarns And Threads?

What Are Flame Resistant Yarns And Threads

 

The video above features untreated continuous multifilament polyester thread on the left, which burns vigorously once ignition temperature is reached, melts, emits black smoke and drips. Untreated aramid yarn on the right burns with difficulty because of high LOI. The flame extinguishes when the heat source is removed.  Aramid does not melt but decomposes showing signs of thermal degradation.

Read more

Service Class 7 Troubleshooting Video Guide

Is your industrial sewing process affected by thread skips, breaks, and shedding? In our latest video tutorial, Service Thread Sewing Sales & Tech Support Manager, Dane Hatcher demonstrates how to avoid thread problems by properly adjusting your machine.

Read more

Older Posts

Bonded thread size is communicated in various ways, mainly by ticket number and tex size. Although it’s easy to get caught up in the lingo and confuse the two, the ticket number and tex size are distinct characteristics of a bonded thread.

Read more

Anyone who works with industrial fabrics knows DuPont™ Kevlar® has a reputation for being one of the world’s toughest fabrics. However, it’s sometimes criticized for being impossible to dye. This isn’t completely true.

Read more

When industrial sewing operations require high thread or yarn tensions, properly designed sewing threads and yarns are critical to continuous production flow. Bonded sewing thread and yarn tends to perform well for critical and challenging sewing conditions often faced by manufacturing companies. We’d like to provide some insight into how bonded thread affects tension in industrial sewing and manufacturing.

Read more

It’s important to evaluate whether you should be using a bonded or non-bonded thread in your industrial sewing process. For manufacturers, each type of industrial sewing thread or yarn has its own set of advantages and disadvantages, so let’s take a closer look at each option and which might be right for your application.

Read more

When you’re sewing at high speeds, bonded thread prevents snags and breaks that cause production interruptions and create flaws in your products. In many applications, bonded sewing thread is almost always a superior choice. 

Read more

Nylon is a family of polymers, and all nylons share certain characteristics. However,there are some significant differences among types of nylon. Not all nylons are the same.

Read more

Are you using the most modern and advanced yarn and thread? If you haven’t re-evaluated your options lately, it’s a good time to compare the latest yarn and thread materials to see if there is a better choice.

Read more
What Is The Difference Between Flame Retardant And Flame Resistant Threads And Yarns
 
Untreated continuous multifilament polyester yarn, on the left, burns vigorously when the ignition temperature is reached, then melts, emits black smoke, and drips. FR treated continuous multifilament polyester, in the middle, shrinks away from the flame, melts, and drips, but it resists flaming once the source is removed. Therefore the smoke is greatly reduced and the retardant has done its job. Untreated aramid yarn, on the right, burns with difficulty because of its high LOI, so the flame extinguishes when the heat source is removed. Aramid does not melt but decomposes, showing signs of thermal degradation.

Read more
What Are Flame Resistant Yarns And Threads

 

The video above features untreated continuous multifilament polyester thread on the left, which burns vigorously once ignition temperature is reached, melts, emits black smoke and drips. Untreated aramid yarn on the right burns with difficulty because of high LOI. The flame extinguishes when the heat source is removed.  Aramid does not melt but decomposes showing signs of thermal degradation.

Read more