Troubleshooting Series - How to Check Industrial Sewing Thread

Checking your sewing thread regularly is the best way to prevent wearing and shedding that can harm your sewing process.

In this video, Service Thread Sewing Sales and Tech Support Manager Dane Hatcher demonstrates how to check your thread for UV damage, look for bond separation, examine the twist level, check the bobbin tack, and make sure you have enough lube in the top thread.

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Troubleshooting Series - Industrial Sewing Tension Setting Tutorial

If your machine’s tension is wrong, you’ll deal with thread shedding, pulling, and breakage, plus poor stitch quality.

In this video from our troubleshooting series, Service Thread Sewing Sales and Tech Support Manager Dane Hatcher demonstrates how to adjust your bobbin tension, how to avoid common mistakes, and how to know when the tension is just right.

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Troubleshooting Series - Industrial Sewing Shuttle Maintenance Tutorial

Do you have lint or lubrication buildup in your industrial sewing machine’s shuttle?

In this video, Service Thread Sewing Sales and Tech Support Manager Dane Hatcher demonstrates how to remove the shuttle and shuttle race, then perform a quick examination and cleaning routine that ensures your machine is in good working order.

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How to Estimate a Yarn or Thread Size Using Diameter

The relationship between yarn diameter and yarn size can be critical in determining the final product and fiber needed to meet specific application requirements.  A yarn or thread size and its diameter will affect the coverage of a yarn in a hose, how large of a yarn will fit into a wire or cable, and is important in determining the needle size required in industrial sewing applications.

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Thread and Yarn Tension Control - 4 Benefits of Using a Creel

A creel is simply a frame on which the feeding thread or yarn bobbin is fitted. Often, the creel is fitted with a yarn tensioning device which controls tension variation. Proper placement and stabilization of thread and yarn at the beginning of the product manufacturing process is critical. “Think of a creel as the foundation of a building,” states Neal Fournier, Facilities & Maintenance Manager with Service Thread. “It’s likely that process improvement starts after the yarn enters the production process; however, you will be surprised by the gains that can be made by taking a look at using a creel or refining your creel design.” 

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Troubleshooting Series - How to Check Industrial Sewing Thread

Checking your sewing thread regularly is the best way to prevent wearing and shedding that can harm your sewing process.

In this video, Service Thread Sewing Sales and Tech Support Manager Dane Hatcher demonstrates how to check your thread for UV damage, look for bond separation, examine the twist level, check the bobbin tack, and make sure you have enough lube in the top thread.

Read more

Older Posts

If your machine’s tension is wrong, you’ll deal with thread shedding, pulling, and breakage, plus poor stitch quality.

In this video from our troubleshooting series, Service Thread Sewing Sales and Tech Support Manager Dane Hatcher demonstrates how to adjust your bobbin tension, how to avoid common mistakes, and how to know when the tension is just right.

Read more

Do you have lint or lubrication buildup in your industrial sewing machine’s shuttle?

In this video, Service Thread Sewing Sales and Tech Support Manager Dane Hatcher demonstrates how to remove the shuttle and shuttle race, then perform a quick examination and cleaning routine that ensures your machine is in good working order.

Read more

The relationship between yarn diameter and yarn size can be critical in determining the final product and fiber needed to meet specific application requirements.  A yarn or thread size and its diameter will affect the coverage of a yarn in a hose, how large of a yarn will fit into a wire or cable, and is important in determining the needle size required in industrial sewing applications.

Read more

A creel is simply a frame on which the feeding thread or yarn bobbin is fitted. Often, the creel is fitted with a yarn tensioning device which controls tension variation. Proper placement and stabilization of thread and yarn at the beginning of the product manufacturing process is critical. “Think of a creel as the foundation of a building,” states Neal Fournier, Facilities & Maintenance Manager with Service Thread. “It’s likely that process improvement starts after the yarn enters the production process; however, you will be surprised by the gains that can be made by taking a look at using a creel or refining your creel design.” 

Read more
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