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Posts by Leslie A Bathie

Advantages of Round Twisted and Flat Lacing Tape Stator Cords

When you buy an electric motor, what is often unseen when handling it is the work that goes into helping extend its life by securing the end coils of windings. This process is called stator lacing. Tightly lacing the coils adds stability and helps protect the windings from vibration, which can cause fatigue and shorten a motor’s life. It also holds electronic, thermal, and other sensory devices in place during the dipping and baking process.

Service Thread’s round lacing cords are available in polyester, nylon, and para-aramid materials such as DuPont™ Kevlar® material. These are cabled constructions, typically three or sometimes four-ply, which offer a round cross-section. Round twisted sizes in nylon and polyester cords can range from number 138 to 690 (tex 135 to 700), offering minimum breaking strengths in the range of 18 to 100 pounds.

However, most common round twisted sizes are number 346 (tex 350), number 415 (tex 400), number 554 (tex 600), and number 690 (tex 700), which offer minimum breaking strengths in the range of 45 to 100 pounds. Round twisted lacing cords number 138 to 690 (tex 135 to 700) will have a diameter between about .01 to .05 inches, while the diameter of most common lacing cords will be .035 inches plus or minus about 15%.

Flat number 554 (tex 600) nylon lacing tape is also a popular choice. Being wider than round twisted thread, it will spread the stress over the coil surface during winding and tying rather than having it located at a small radius. Flat tape also offers increased grip due to its larger surface area.

Round thread can be laced evenly from large supply packages of more than or equal to 10 pounds. Flat constructions are typically rolled to prevent any twisting of the tape. Round twisted lacing cords are much preferred over cable ties, which turn brittle over time through oxidation and break and leave sharp edges which can cut installers’ hands when reaching into confined spaces.

Lacing cords may have some physical requirements, depending on the motor design and coil assembly.

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Why Do I Need Bonded Thread For My Process?

When you’re sewing at high speeds, bonded thread prevents snags and breaks that cause production interruptions and create flaws in your products. In many applications, bonded sewing thread is almost always a superior choice. 

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Overview of Advanced and Modern Materials for Yarn and Thread Construction

Are you using the most modern and advanced yarn and thread? If you haven’t re-evaluated your options lately, it’s a good time to compare the latest yarn and thread materials to see if there is a better choice.

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Flame Retardant vs. Flame Resistant Threads And Yarns

What Is The Difference Between Flame Retardant And Flame Resistant Threads And Yarns
 
Untreated continuous multifilament polyester yarn, on the left, burns vigorously when the ignition temperature is reached, then melts, emits black smoke, and drips. FR treated continuous multifilament polyester, in the middle, shrinks away from the flame, melts, and drips, but it resists flaming once the source is removed. Therefore the smoke is greatly reduced and the retardant has done its job. Untreated aramid yarn, on the right, burns with difficulty because of its high LOI, so the flame extinguishes when the heat source is removed. Aramid does not melt but decomposes, showing signs of thermal degradation.

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What Are Flame Resistant Yarns And Threads?

What Are Flame Resistant Yarns And Threads

 

The video above features untreated continuous multifilament polyester thread on the left, which burns vigorously once ignition temperature is reached, melts, emits black smoke and drips. Untreated aramid yarn on the right burns with difficulty because of high LOI. The flame extinguishes when the heat source is removed.  Aramid does not melt but decomposes showing signs of thermal degradation.

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What is Flame Retardant Yarn and Thread?

Fame Retardant_with_Music

The video above features NeC 8/4 staple spun polyester. The untreated thread on the left burns vigorously once ignition temperature is reached, melts, emits black smoke and drips. The treated thread on the right melts and drips, however, resists combustion and flaming, therefore, smoke is greatly reduced, retardant has done its job.

Read more

Understanding Ohm Values in Conductive Yarns or Yarns for Static Dissipation

Ohm values vary for different industrial yarn and threads. Your choice depends on your specific application - do you need conductivity or static dissipation in your process or product? 

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How Can Industrial Thread and Yarn Twist Affect Your Process?

To understand twist contraction, think about a ship’s mooring rope. It’s a large, thick rope with thousands of yarns braided and twisted inside. Try to lift a section of the rope, and you’ll find it’s quite heavy.

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What is Young’s Modulus?

Every time you drive down the road and see suspended utility cables, you’re observing Young’s Modulus in action. The raised utility wires have a high modulus and are retaining their shape, even under the high pressures of aerial suspension and weather.

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Replacing DuraFiber Polyester Yarn

DuraFiber Technologies, (formerly Performance Fibers), submitted a WARN notice on July 13, 2017 announcing steps to prepare for the possible closure of their U.S. plants in Salisbury, Shelby, and Winnsboro. 

Read more

Leslie A Bathie

VP Technical R&D

Recent Posts

Advantages of Round Twisted and Flat Lacing Tape Stator Cords

When you buy an electric motor, what is often unseen when handling it is the work that goes into helping extend its life by securing the end coils of windings. This process is called stator lacing. Tightly lacing the coils adds stability and helps protect the windings from vibration, which can cause fatigue and shorten a motor’s life. It also holds electronic, thermal, and other sensory devices in place during the dipping and baking process.

Service Thread’s round lacing cords are available in polyester, nylon, and para-aramid materials such as DuPont™ Kevlar® material. These are cabled constructions, typically three or sometimes four-ply, which offer a round cross-section. Round twisted sizes in nylon and polyester cords can range from number 138 to 690 (tex 135 to 700), offering minimum breaking strengths in the range of 18 to 100 pounds.

However, most common round twisted sizes are number 346 (tex 350), number 415 (tex 400), number 554 (tex 600), and number 690 (tex 700), which offer minimum breaking strengths in the range of 45 to 100 pounds. Round twisted lacing cords number 138 to 690 (tex 135 to 700) will have a diameter between about .01 to .05 inches, while the diameter of most common lacing cords will be .035 inches plus or minus about 15%.

Flat number 554 (tex 600) nylon lacing tape is also a popular choice. Being wider than round twisted thread, it will spread the stress over the coil surface during winding and tying rather than having it located at a small radius. Flat tape also offers increased grip due to its larger surface area.

Round thread can be laced evenly from large supply packages of more than or equal to 10 pounds. Flat constructions are typically rolled to prevent any twisting of the tape. Round twisted lacing cords are much preferred over cable ties, which turn brittle over time through oxidation and break and leave sharp edges which can cut installers’ hands when reaching into confined spaces.

Lacing cords may have some physical requirements, depending on the motor design and coil assembly.

Read more

Older Posts

When you’re sewing at high speeds, bonded thread prevents snags and breaks that cause production interruptions and create flaws in your products. In many applications, bonded sewing thread is almost always a superior choice. 

Read more

Are you using the most modern and advanced yarn and thread? If you haven’t re-evaluated your options lately, it’s a good time to compare the latest yarn and thread materials to see if there is a better choice.

Read more
What Is The Difference Between Flame Retardant And Flame Resistant Threads And Yarns
 
Untreated continuous multifilament polyester yarn, on the left, burns vigorously when the ignition temperature is reached, then melts, emits black smoke, and drips. FR treated continuous multifilament polyester, in the middle, shrinks away from the flame, melts, and drips, but it resists flaming once the source is removed. Therefore the smoke is greatly reduced and the retardant has done its job. Untreated aramid yarn, on the right, burns with difficulty because of its high LOI, so the flame extinguishes when the heat source is removed. Aramid does not melt but decomposes, showing signs of thermal degradation.

Read more
What Are Flame Resistant Yarns And Threads

 

The video above features untreated continuous multifilament polyester thread on the left, which burns vigorously once ignition temperature is reached, melts, emits black smoke and drips. Untreated aramid yarn on the right burns with difficulty because of high LOI. The flame extinguishes when the heat source is removed.  Aramid does not melt but decomposes showing signs of thermal degradation.

Read more
Fame Retardant_with_Music

The video above features NeC 8/4 staple spun polyester. The untreated thread on the left burns vigorously once ignition temperature is reached, melts, emits black smoke and drips. The treated thread on the right melts and drips, however, resists combustion and flaming, therefore, smoke is greatly reduced, retardant has done its job.

Read more

Ohm values vary for different industrial yarn and threads. Your choice depends on your specific application - do you need conductivity or static dissipation in your process or product? 

Read more

To understand twist contraction, think about a ship’s mooring rope. It’s a large, thick rope with thousands of yarns braided and twisted inside. Try to lift a section of the rope, and you’ll find it’s quite heavy.

Read more

Every time you drive down the road and see suspended utility cables, you’re observing Young’s Modulus in action. The raised utility wires have a high modulus and are retaining their shape, even under the high pressures of aerial suspension and weather.

Read more

DuraFiber Technologies, (formerly Performance Fibers), submitted a WARN notice on July 13, 2017 announcing steps to prepare for the possible closure of their U.S. plants in Salisbury, Shelby, and Winnsboro. 

Read more