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Posts by Leslie A Bathie

Overview of Advanced and Modern Materials for Yarn and Thread Construction

Are you using the most modern and advanced yarn and thread? If you haven’t re-evaluated your options lately, it’s a good time to compare the latest yarn and thread materials to see if there is a better choice.

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Flame Retardant vs. Flame Resistant Threads And Yarns

What Is The Difference Between Flame Retardant And Flame Resistant Threads And Yarns
 
Untreated continuous multifilament polyester yarn, on the left, burns vigorously when the ignition temperature is reached, then melts, emits black smoke, and drips. FR treated continuous multifilament polyester, in the middle, shrinks away from the flame, melts, and drips, but it resists flaming once the source is removed. Therefore the smoke is greatly reduced and the retardant has done its job. Untreated aramid yarn, on the right, burns with difficulty because of its high LOI, so the flame extinguishes when the heat source is removed. Aramid does not melt but decomposes, showing signs of thermal degradation.

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What Are Flame Resistant Yarns And Threads?

What Are Flame Resistant Yarns And Threads

 

The video above features untreated continuous multifilament polyester thread on the left, which burns vigorously once ignition temperature is reached, melts, emits black smoke and drips. Untreated aramid yarn on the right burns with difficulty because of high LOI. The flame extinguishes when the heat source is removed.  Aramid does not melt but decomposes showing signs of thermal degradation.

Read more

What is Flame Retardant Yarn and Thread?

Fame Retardant_with_Music

The video above features NeC 8/4 staple spun polyester. The untreated thread on the left burns vigorously once ignition temperature is reached, melts, emits black smoke and drips. The treated thread on the right melts and drips, however, resists combustion and flaming, therefore, smoke is greatly reduced, retardant has done its job.

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Understanding Ohm Values in Conductive Yarns or Yarns for Static Dissipation

Ohm values vary for different industrial yarn and threads. Your choice depends on your specific application - do you need conductivity or static dissipation in your process or product? 

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How Can Industrial Thread and Yarn Twist Affect Your Process?

To understand twist contraction, think about a ship’s mooring rope. It’s a large, thick rope with thousands of yarns braided and twisted inside. Try to lift a section of the rope, and you’ll find it’s quite heavy.

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What is Young’s Modulus?

Every time you drive down the road and see suspended utility cables, you’re observing Young’s Modulus in action. The raised utility wires have a high modulus and are retaining their shape, even under the high pressures of aerial suspension and weather.

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Replacing DuraFiber Polyester Yarn

DuraFiber Technologies, (formerly Performance Fibers), submitted a WARN notice on July 13, 2017 announcing steps to prepare for the possible closure of their U.S. plants in Salisbury, Shelby, and Winnsboro. 

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POY and FOY in Continuous Filament Polyester Sewing Thread

 Continuous filament polyester can be supplied in many forms but the most common for industrial applications are partially orientated yarn (POY) and fully orientated yarn (FOY).

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Materials Science for Industrial Threads and Yarns - Polyester and Nylon 

Modern nylon and polyester filament yarns share some similarities that may allow for cost reductions through materials engineering where polyester replaces nylon.  However, there are some key differences to consider when designing an industrial sewing thread, hose reinforcement yarn, or textile binder or strength member. How are these fibers similar and how do they differ?  The answers can be found in looking at the basic properties, and more importantly the end product application and environmental exposure to the fibers that will make all the difference in product success or failure,

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Leslie A Bathie

VP Technical R&D

Recent Posts

Overview of Advanced and Modern Materials for Yarn and Thread Construction

Are you using the most modern and advanced yarn and thread? If you haven’t re-evaluated your options lately, it’s a good time to compare the latest yarn and thread materials to see if there is a better choice.

Read more

Older Posts

What Is The Difference Between Flame Retardant And Flame Resistant Threads And Yarns
 
Untreated continuous multifilament polyester yarn, on the left, burns vigorously when the ignition temperature is reached, then melts, emits black smoke, and drips. FR treated continuous multifilament polyester, in the middle, shrinks away from the flame, melts, and drips, but it resists flaming once the source is removed. Therefore the smoke is greatly reduced and the retardant has done its job. Untreated aramid yarn, on the right, burns with difficulty because of its high LOI, so the flame extinguishes when the heat source is removed. Aramid does not melt but decomposes, showing signs of thermal degradation.

Read more
What Are Flame Resistant Yarns And Threads

 

The video above features untreated continuous multifilament polyester thread on the left, which burns vigorously once ignition temperature is reached, melts, emits black smoke and drips. Untreated aramid yarn on the right burns with difficulty because of high LOI. The flame extinguishes when the heat source is removed.  Aramid does not melt but decomposes showing signs of thermal degradation.

Read more
Fame Retardant_with_Music

The video above features NeC 8/4 staple spun polyester. The untreated thread on the left burns vigorously once ignition temperature is reached, melts, emits black smoke and drips. The treated thread on the right melts and drips, however, resists combustion and flaming, therefore, smoke is greatly reduced, retardant has done its job.

Read more

Ohm values vary for different industrial yarn and threads. Your choice depends on your specific application - do you need conductivity or static dissipation in your process or product? 

Read more

To understand twist contraction, think about a ship’s mooring rope. It’s a large, thick rope with thousands of yarns braided and twisted inside. Try to lift a section of the rope, and you’ll find it’s quite heavy.

Read more

Every time you drive down the road and see suspended utility cables, you’re observing Young’s Modulus in action. The raised utility wires have a high modulus and are retaining their shape, even under the high pressures of aerial suspension and weather.

Read more

DuraFiber Technologies, (formerly Performance Fibers), submitted a WARN notice on July 13, 2017 announcing steps to prepare for the possible closure of their U.S. plants in Salisbury, Shelby, and Winnsboro. 

Read more

 Continuous filament polyester can be supplied in many forms but the most common for industrial applications are partially orientated yarn (POY) and fully orientated yarn (FOY).

Read more

Modern nylon and polyester filament yarns share some similarities that may allow for cost reductions through materials engineering where polyester replaces nylon.  However, there are some key differences to consider when designing an industrial sewing thread, hose reinforcement yarn, or textile binder or strength member. How are these fibers similar and how do they differ?  The answers can be found in looking at the basic properties, and more importantly the end product application and environmental exposure to the fibers that will make all the difference in product success or failure,

Read more