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How much does Kevlar® (Aramid) cost?

Aramid fiber is best known by the trademark name DuPont™ Kevlar® and offers many unique and beneficial properties.  With aramid raw material costs between five and thirty times the cost of nylon or polyester, many manufacturers look for ways to save when aramids are required for their application. What seems on the surface like an easy question is a lot more complicated than you might think.  So, what are some of the factors that contribute to the total cost of industrial aramid yarn or thread?

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Standard Tenacity Yarn vs. High Modulus Aramid Yarn – Which Do You Need?

Tenacity and modulus are important characteristics to understand as they relate to industrial thread and yarn – particularly for applications in the wire and cable industry. They differ from one another in that tenacity is the ratio of tensile strength to yarn size. Tenacity is calculated using the ultimate breaking force of the yarn (when a thread or yarn is stretched to its breaking point) and the linear density and can be used to compare dissimilar material or different sizes of material. 

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Thread and Yarn Tension Control - 4 Benefits of Using a Creel

A creel is simply a frame on which the feeding thread or yarn bobbin is fitted. Often, the creel is fitted with a yarn tensioning device which controls tension variation. Proper placement and stabilization of thread and yarn at the beginning of the product manufacturing process is critical. “Think of a creel as the foundation of a building,” states Neal Fournier, Facilities & Maintenance Manager with Service Thread. “It’s likely that process improvement starts after the yarn enters the production process; however, you will be surprised by the gains that can be made by taking a look at using a creel or refining your creel design.” 

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3 Common Industrial Yarn Joining Methods Explained

The practice of joining industrial yarn ends (resulting from breaks, defects, or end of the supply), is a critical component to the product manufacturing process, particularly in industries such as wire and cable (integration of ripcords), hose reinforcement, belting and more. When using industrial yarn in the production process, it is essential that the joining method endures the process without interruption and does not have a negative effect on the quality of the end product.   

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Vectran™ Vs. Aramid

Both Vectran™ and Aramid yarns are known for being resilient materials used for specialized products. They each have varying degrees of creep resistance, abrasion resistance, high tensile strength, excellent flex/fold characteristics, long term dimensional stability and exceptional property retention at high temperatures. These yarns are extremely durable and often used to protect people and products.

Read more

What is Vectran™?

Vectran™ is a manufactured fiber used to make specialty fabric and typically only those with a specific product application know much about it. This multifilament yarn is spun from a liquid crystal polymer (LCP) and is the only commercially available melt-spun LCP fiber in the world. Vectran™ fiber presents exceptional strength and rigidity because the material is five times stronger than steel and ten times stronger than aluminum. There are no real alternatives when it comes to working with Vectran™ as the qualities it brings to the table are distinctive and highly beneficial.

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Water Blocking Test Method for Industrial Yarns - Wire & Cable

When yarn used in a wire and cable application prevents access of water and moisture to the critical elements - it is considered to be waterblocking. This feature is also known as water swellable or water absorbent. There are also various treatments that can be applied to a yarn to enhance its waterblocking characteristics. The most important function is that the yarn absorbs or blocks water in a way that stops water from causing damage to your product.

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Polyester Yarn Price Update Part Two: Understanding Market, Spot and Indexed Pricing

In part one of Service Thread’s blog series on polyester yarn pricing, I discussed the reason for the unpredictable cost swings with polyester yarn pricing. In addition to understanding the global dynamics that effect these swings, it is also important to understand the pricing strategies used.

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Importance of High Modulus Yarn for Wire and Cable Explained

Modulus (fiber elasticity) is a key characteristic of industrial yarn and thread for wire and cable - specifically aramid yarns. Modulus refers to the ratio of stress (force per unit area) along an axis to strain (ratio of deformation over initial length) along that axis. Think about when you stretch a rubber band out to the point right before it deforms or breaks – that is the modulus. When something stretches to the point of deformation, the strength is almost always compromised.

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Waterblocking Yarns and Threads for Wire & Cable

The critical reason for using waterblocking fiber in wire and cable manufacturing is to prevent access and dissipation of water and moisture throughout the cable. In fact, water is the most likely cause of premature failure for cable and electrical equipment. There are two common ways water and moisture finds its way into a cable: 

Read more

How much does Kevlar® (Aramid) cost?

Aramid fiber is best known by the trademark name DuPont™ Kevlar® and offers many unique and beneficial properties.  With aramid raw material costs between five and thirty times the cost of nylon or polyester, many manufacturers look for ways to save when aramids are required for their application. What seems on the surface like an easy question is a lot more complicated than you might think.  So, what are some of the factors that contribute to the total cost of industrial aramid yarn or thread?

Read more

Older Posts

Tenacity and modulus are important characteristics to understand as they relate to industrial thread and yarn – particularly for applications in the wire and cable industry. They differ from one another in that tenacity is the ratio of tensile strength to yarn size. Tenacity is calculated using the ultimate breaking force of the yarn (when a thread or yarn is stretched to its breaking point) and the linear density and can be used to compare dissimilar material or different sizes of material. 

Read more

A creel is simply a frame on which the feeding thread or yarn bobbin is fitted. Often, the creel is fitted with a yarn tensioning device which controls tension variation. Proper placement and stabilization of thread and yarn at the beginning of the product manufacturing process is critical. “Think of a creel as the foundation of a building,” states Neal Fournier, Facilities & Maintenance Manager with Service Thread. “It’s likely that process improvement starts after the yarn enters the production process; however, you will be surprised by the gains that can be made by taking a look at using a creel or refining your creel design.” 

Read more

The practice of joining industrial yarn ends (resulting from breaks, defects, or end of the supply), is a critical component to the product manufacturing process, particularly in industries such as wire and cable (integration of ripcords), hose reinforcement, belting and more. When using industrial yarn in the production process, it is essential that the joining method endures the process without interruption and does not have a negative effect on the quality of the end product.   

Read more

Both Vectran™ and Aramid yarns are known for being resilient materials used for specialized products. They each have varying degrees of creep resistance, abrasion resistance, high tensile strength, excellent flex/fold characteristics, long term dimensional stability and exceptional property retention at high temperatures. These yarns are extremely durable and often used to protect people and products.

Read more

Vectran™ is a manufactured fiber used to make specialty fabric and typically only those with a specific product application know much about it. This multifilament yarn is spun from a liquid crystal polymer (LCP) and is the only commercially available melt-spun LCP fiber in the world. Vectran™ fiber presents exceptional strength and rigidity because the material is five times stronger than steel and ten times stronger than aluminum. There are no real alternatives when it comes to working with Vectran™ as the qualities it brings to the table are distinctive and highly beneficial.

Read more

When yarn used in a wire and cable application prevents access of water and moisture to the critical elements - it is considered to be waterblocking. This feature is also known as water swellable or water absorbent. There are also various treatments that can be applied to a yarn to enhance its waterblocking characteristics. The most important function is that the yarn absorbs or blocks water in a way that stops water from causing damage to your product.

Read more

In part one of Service Thread’s blog series on polyester yarn pricing, I discussed the reason for the unpredictable cost swings with polyester yarn pricing. In addition to understanding the global dynamics that effect these swings, it is also important to understand the pricing strategies used.

Read more

Modulus (fiber elasticity) is a key characteristic of industrial yarn and thread for wire and cable - specifically aramid yarns. Modulus refers to the ratio of stress (force per unit area) along an axis to strain (ratio of deformation over initial length) along that axis. Think about when you stretch a rubber band out to the point right before it deforms or breaks – that is the modulus. When something stretches to the point of deformation, the strength is almost always compromised.

Read more

The critical reason for using waterblocking fiber in wire and cable manufacturing is to prevent access and dissipation of water and moisture throughout the cable. In fact, water is the most likely cause of premature failure for cable and electrical equipment. There are two common ways water and moisture finds its way into a cable: 

Read more